IPP Blog

Conference - Maintaing Independence
October 19 2012 4:21 pm

CILT and Community Partners Present:
 
MAINTAINING INDEPENDENCE OUR WAY:

CONFERENCE 2012 

A three-day conference focused on strength-based
parenting with a disability, self-managed attendant service
(Direct Funding), and aging with a disability.

You may register for 1, 2, or 3 days. All 3 days are free to attend. 

WHEN:November 28th – 30th, 2012
Registration begins at 8:30am and each day runs until 4:00pm

WHERE:
OCAD University
49 McCaul Street, Toronto

DAY 1:
NOVEMBER 28TH: Strength-Based Parenting Initiative Network (SPIN)
RSVP to Melanie, ext. 222

DAY 2:
NOVEMBER 29TH: Aging with a Disability
RSVP to Carling, ext. 270

DAY 3:
NOVEMBER 30TH: Self-Managed Attendant
Services – Direct Funding
RSVP to Melissa, ext. 241

Lunch and refreshments will be served  

ASL and other accommodations will be provided upon request.   

We regret we are unable to provide childcare
 
RSVP: BY NOVEMBER 23RD, 2012

Call: (416) 599-2458 or 1-800-354-9950

Disability Celebration in Toronto
September 26 2012 10:41 am

Celebrating Our Lives & Identities

The 9th Annual

Disability Celebration in Toronto

FREE for ALL to Attend!

Brought to you by CANWAPSS (Canada-Wide Accessibility for Post-Secondary Students) & friends of CANWAPSS, Accessible Media Inc., LinkUp Employment Services, Easter Seals Canada (Access 2 Entertainment), and Variety Village

Thursday October 4th, 2012 - 5:00PM to 8:00PM Nathan Phillips Square (Rain or Shine)

LIVE PERFORMANCES(Bands,Comedians,Singers,Dancers, etc.) , GUEST SPEAKERS, DISPLAY TABLES BY VARIOUS ORGANIZATIONS/GROUPS

 www.disabilitycelebration.ca  info@disabilitycelebration.ca

PHONE: (416) 730-1800

VISIT OUR FACEBOOK PAGE @ “Simply People – Disability Celebration”

JOIN OUR TWITTER GROUP @ “SimplyPeopleDC”

* ASL interpretation, attendant care and transcription services available on site. To request any other accessibility requirements, please contact us before September 30th, 2012

http://www.disabilitycelebration.ca/

Ability Arts Festival
September 20 2012 9:13 am

Check out the Ability Arts Festival...

Bringing the vision of artists with disabilities to the attention of the wider community.

WHEN: September 21 to October 11

Check out the link below for more information...

http://abilitiesartsfestival.org/events/current-festival/

Relationships and Disability Discussion Group
September 17 2012 12:48 pm

UPCOMING EVENT: Relationships and Disability – A Night of Discussion

WHAT?: An evening of discussion on disability and relationships; experiences, fears, hopes and questions.

WHEN?: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 from 7:30-9:30pm

WHERE?: Room 560, SHE Building, Ryerson University (99 Gerrard St. E)

WHAT TO EXPECT?: Open, honest and fun discussion about relationships and disability in a safe and positive space.

EXTRA INFORMATION: Accessible washrooms on-site, short walk from Dundas Subway Station, ASL Interpretation provided, attendant care provided. Any further accommodation needs, please contact us

http://therosecentre.ca/category/events/
Movie Screening
September 5 2012 12:54 pm

Making Connections is an exclusive screening of four short films that celebrate those actors who continue to rise above adversity and who are determined to reach their dreams
This free event will be taking place:

Friday September 28, 2012
At Cinecycle: 129 Spadina Ave
(old coach house down alley)
Doors are @ 8:30PM, with Screening beginning @ 9:30 PM. (followed by Q&A and refereshments)

Please see the attached flyer for film details and more information about the event.

https://docs.google.com/a/ofcp.ca/viewer?a=v&pid=gmail&attid=0.1&thid=139970f58ded34a9&mt=application/pdf&url=https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui%3D2%26ik%3D9e03f772f8%26view%3Datt%26th%3D139970f58ded34a9%26attid%3D0.1%26disp%3Dsafe%26zw&sig=AHIEtbS-f4HArX2ki585bdHZTOZmaMwjbg

Study of Post Transitioning - Looking for Particip
August 16 2012 1:50 pm

McMaster University                CanChild - Centre for Childhood Disability Research

"Have you ever thought to yourself: I wish I knew this when I was younger? 

We are looking for you!

Matt Freeman, a PhD student with McMaster University is conducting a study and is seeking young adults 19 - 29 yrs. with Cerebral Palsy whom are no longer attending highschool to participate in a focus group to help discover information gaps during the transition to adulthood

Looking for answers to the following question:

'What is one piece of advice you would give a young person with cerebral palsy transitioning today?'

Date: August 28, 2012

Time: 1:00 - 3:30 pm

Location: OFCP Community Room

              1630 Lawrence Ave. West, Toronto

If you are interested an unable to make it, Matt would still like to hear from you. An individual telephone interview can be arranged.

Participants using Wheel Trans or public transit will be provided with two tokens to cover costs for attending the focus group.

If you are interested in participating in the focus group, or would like further information please contact Matt Freeman by August 24, 2102

Email: freemamt@mcmaster.ca

Phone: 905-525-9140 x27852

 

 

Job Seekers and Employers
August 9 2012 10:58 am

One Voice Network Disability Awareness Event, Sept 27 2012 10am-6pm, Thornhill Community Centre 7755 Bayview Avenue Thornhill Ontario

Learn about the value of workers with disabilities and their positive influence and contributions to the workplace. EmployABILITY targets students with disabilities moving into the workforce, job seekers with disabilities and employers to increase awareness of the supports that exist for both jobseekers and employers in York Region.

Please click on link below for more info:

http://www.onevoicenetwork.ca/Disability-Event/

OMOD Assistive Devices Program
August 1 2012 2:39 pm

Assistive Devices Program 

 

 

The Assistive Devices Program can help you buy, repair and maintain a wide variety of mobility or assistive equipment (including wheelchairs). The Program may also have contact information or resources to help you find alternate funding sources in your area. The Program can also help you obtain funding from local service groups through partnerships with other organizations. The Assistive Devices Program is funded by the United Way in certain locations.

Funding is provided for devices that:

  • Help adults live safely and independently in their homes
  • Allow for discharge from a hospital or rehabilitation centre
  • Help avoid job loss
  • Support opportunities for participation in educational, developmental and community activities

For eligibility criteria, click here.

Apply Now

For more information about the application process,click here.

To start your application now, click here.

http://www.marchofdimes.ca/EN/programs/adp/Pages/Adp.aspx

Quality of Life - Online or In-Person Survey
June 22 2012 11:09 am

Want to share your thoughts and ideas about your quality of life as a person with disabilities in Ontario? You are invited to share your experiences in two ways: an online survey or joining an in-person meeting. The purpose of the project is to find out from people with disabilities in Ontario what is important to them about their quality of life. What makes your day easier and better?

 The project - conducted by Cathexis Consulting - will use your input to find the best way for determining the impact of Ontario's accessibility standards in the future.

To access the Survey -  

Visit: http://app.fluidsurveys.com/s/quality-of-life-survey/

To RSVP to an in-person meeting -

Visit: http://app.fluidsurveys.com/surveys/cathexis/language-link-for-ado-rsvp/

 

Gateway to Breast Health - Info Session
June 22 2012 10:42 am

http://www.cilt.ca/whats_new.aspx

 

 

 The Centre for Independent Living in Toronto and Mount Sinai Hospital

Proudly present a free community launch event…

 

GATEWAYS TO BREAST HEALTH

for Women with Disabilities

 

 

 

 

 

“One of the things that we've talked about, different friends and I, is that we are the first generation of people with disabilities that's lived this long, so they don't know what to expect as we age, it's different than the average person which means different health issues come up.”

              From Heather’s Story

 

 

 

 

“You have to be on top of your own needs, your own healthcare… I think it would be very interesting to do some kind of survey just to find out how many people with disabilities have been referred for mammograms.”

             From Audrey’s Story

 

 

 

 

“The minute a woman walks into our [breast screening] department her mental state is already altered. So for a woman who is already facing some challenges, some physical disabilities, it's even worse for them because they really don't know what they’re going to face, what they're going to be able to do, is somebody going to get stressed out because of them, are they going to get upset because she can't do certain things?”

             From Supriya’s Story

 

 

  

 

 

Based on research that explored the stories of women with disabilities accessing cancer screening and the healthcare providers who work with them, this presentation showcases innovative education tools and resources which can be used to help create an enabling environment in mammography clinics and promote a positive breast cancer screening experience for all women.

 

 

 

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

6:00 – 7:30 pm

 

Ryerson University

Podium (POD) 250

350 Victoria Street

Toronto, ON

 

For information and to RSVP, kindly please contact Carling Barry by June 22nd, 2012 at:

(phone)   416-599-2458 ext 270

(TTY)     416-599-5077

(email)    carling.barry@cilt.ca

 

Attendant services, note taking, and ASL will be available. Other accommodations may be available upon request. Light refreshments will be served.

 

 

   Home     GatewayLogoMSH Logo - colour with tag    

 

 

 The Centre for Independent Living in Toronto and Mount Sinai Hospital

Proudly present a free community launch event...

 

GATEWAYS TO BREAST HEALTH

for Women with Disabilities

 

 

 

 

 

"One of the things that we've talked about, different friends and I, is that we are the first generation of people with disabilities that's lived this long, so they don't know what to expect as we age, it's different than the average person which means different health issues come up."

              From Heather's Story

 

 

 

 

"You have to be on top of your own needs, your own healthcare... I think it would be very interesting to do some kind of survey just to find out how many people with disabilities have been referred for mammograms."

             From Audrey's Story

 

 

 

 

"The minute a woman walks into our [breast screening] department her mental state is already altered. So for a woman who is already facing some challenges, some physical disabilities, it's even worse for them because they really don't know what they're going to face, what they're going to be able to do, is somebody going to get stressed out because of them, are they going to get upset because she can't do certain things?"

             From Supriya's Story

 

 

  

 

 

Based on research that explored the stories of women with disabilities accessing cancer screening and the healthcare providers who work with them, this presentation showcases innovative education tools and resources which can be used to help create an enabling environment in mammography clinics and promote a positive breast cancer screening experience for all women.

 

 

 

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

6:00 - 7:30 pm

 

Ryerson University

Podium (POD) 250

350 Victoria Street

Toronto, ON

 

For information and to RSVP, kindly please contact Carling Barry by June 22nd, 2012 at:

(phone)   416-599-2458 ext 270

(TTY)     416-599-5077

(email)    carling.barry@cilt.ca

 

Attendant services, note taking, and ASL will be available. Other accommodations may be available upon request. Light refreshments will be served.

 

 

   Home     GatewayLogoMSH Logo - colour with tag    

 

 

Severely disabled Toronto man has rich life thanks
June 18 2012 12:49 pm

http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1212224--severely-disabled-toronto-man-has-rich-life-thanks-to-home-care

Gabriel West loves to ride the subway. So I rode it with him and his two dear friends Steve Lappano and Ryan Blakely, the other day, all the way from Broadview to Kipling and back again.

Sitting in his wheelchair, West giggled — it sounded like a high-pitched whine — and cracked jokes about how he was going to take off to Ottawa. He barked like a dog and pretended to chew his friends’ doughnut cheeks. The three of them cuddled and held hands like a pack of giddy 4-year-olds.

Except West is 35, and his friends are around the same age.

West has cerebral palsy, extreme epilepsy and is blind. He is dependent on attendants like Lappano (current) and Blakely (past) for all his mundane and profound needs.

But his life is joyous and full.

He packs hampers at a food bank once a week.

He’s a regular at a downtown church.

He lives in his own apartment on the ground floor of his mother’s tiny east-end house.

He is proof that even the most disabled can live autonomous lives, given support.

“I want to give you a kiss,” he says, stroking Lappano’s head. “I love you.” An older woman across the aisle and I both smile at the sight. How often do you see grown men fawn over one another? When is the last time one of your friends fawned over you?

It hasn’t always been this way. For much of his childhood, West was locked into places — broom closets, bed frames, the inside of a classroom while the rest of his classmates played outside. His mother, Martha Eleen, recalls how teachers even made him stew in his feces, trying to train him out of his disability.

“He’s been tied up in every single segregated program he’s gone to,” she says.

She abandoned her aspirations of an art career and picked up welfare cheques to care for him full-time.

In the early 1990s, she lobbied the Ontario government for help and was given 55 hours a week of attendant care — just under eight hours a day. That didn’t last long: the Harris regime slashed it by a third and promised to reduce it to two hours a day after West turned 18.

The Gabe West campaign was launched, which was gruelling and head-bangingly frustrating, as battles with bureaucracy tend to be. One snippet: Eleen and West visited 53 group homes in the city to prove to the Ministry of Community and Social Services what they knew all along: Gabe wouldn’t or couldn’t be admitted to any of them.

Finally, after two years, the government relented. It gave Eleen around $72,000 a year to pay for daytime homecare for West.

Eleen launched her painting career. West joined a native drumming circle and rode the subway to appointments around the city. (He loves the sounds and movement of the trains. Shut your eyes for a while when you are next on it. He’s right — it’s pretty special.) He developed deep friendships with his attendants, who clearly adore him.

A year ago, West’s seizures kicked into high gear — from one a month to three a night. Eleen rushed him to the ER time and time again, concerned he would slip into “status epilepticus,” or an unabating seizure, which can be fatal. (At 15, West’s brain was damaged by an unending seizure. Eleen says he lost much of his speech and motor skills in his hands.) Then, his bladder stopped functioning. He now needs to be catheterized.

Since then, Eleen spends most nights awake, caring for her son. She’s exhausted and scrambled but driven by fear of other options.

“It’s my body keeping him here — 379 hours a month,” she says. “I’ve been burnt-out for more than 20 years. If I get sick, Gabe has the grimmest future — with restraints and a life with no community. He would die.”

She’s brushed off the Gabe West campaign and plugged it back into that well-worn socket. West has already done two assessments with two different ministry agencies to prove his needs again. Eleen drafted a budget for 24-hour care, plus worker benefits, totalling $180,000. Last week, she met with some Ministry of Community and Social Services officials. She says they said she would be eligible for only an extra $7,000.

“They said the only other option was a nursing home,” Eleen says.

I am haunted by memories of visiting my husband’s grandfather in a nursing home and finding him sitting alone in a dark hall with his pants half on. We all know what will happen to West in a nursing home: no more drumming or food hamper-packing or cuddling with friends on the subway.

Do you think $180,000 is too much to pay for a life?

Watching West, I realize it’s not just he who will suffer, but all of us. West is a reminder that life is about more than budgets. It’s about delighting in the regular subway sounds and tender love.

“The things Gabe can offer us are so different than what people usually think they need to have a good life,” says Lappano, unfolding himself from a moment from West. “For Gabe, everything is relationships.”

If we don’t take care of the most vulnerable, what hope is there for rest of us?

Instead of fighting Eleen, the Ministry of Community and Social Services should study her work. While the ministry espouses community living on its website, she and West live it. Eleen has developed a wonderful iteration of community living — a flexible, unique, innovative model that works.

Give her the money she needs so we can keep West in our lives.

Catherine Porter’s column usually appears on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. She can be reached at cporter@thestar.ca


Employing Canadians with Disabilities
May 30 2012 2:07 pm

Finding jobs for disabled Canadians

In late 2009 I had a quiet word with Federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty. We spoke with the easy intimacy of strangers who have something life-changing in common. Jim Flaherty and I are parents of children with disabilities.

Mr. Flaherty’s son John, one of triplets, nearly died before the age of 2 after an insect bite caused encephalitis, swelling of the brain. My daughter Quinn lay near death at 4 after meningitis attacked the protective lining of her brain. John has a mental disability. Quinn is deaf.

Perhaps the minister did not topple into the financial abyss that so often swallows families like mine when a child is disabled. However, I’m pretty sure he and his wife, Christine Elliott, shed many of the same tears my husband, David Cruise, and I did as our children travelled the long and frequently terrifying road from infancy to adulthood.

On the day of our chat, the launch of Credit Education Week Canada, I thanked Minister Flaherty for initiating the Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) two years earlier. The RDSP, with grants of up to $4,500 annually for lower income families, means that the disabled have a shot at accumulating a retirement nest egg, rarely possible for a group with low or non-existent earned income.

Two-and-a-half years later, I would like another quiet word with Mr. Flaherty. In his April budget speech he made it clear his government wants to see more disabled Canadians employed. My daughter is among millions who couldn’t agree more.

You might not think this column is about personal finance, but it is. Those unemployed and underemployed millions hit all of us in our wallets. According to Statistics Canada 12.5 million Canadians are disabled. Of those 15 to 64 years old, 54 per cent are unemployed or not in the workforce. And about half of those who are unemployed earn less than $15,000 annually.

I don’t think it is a stretch to say that if the unemployment rate were the same for the disabled, who are capable of work, as it is for the rest of the population, the government might not have had to delay eligibility for Old Age Security, as was announced last month.

There would be more taxes in government coffers and the health costs associated with disabilities would plummet as an entire population has the opportunity to feel better about themselves and lead happier lives. Not only that but the working disabled would be an economic stimulus onto themselves with money to spend. Finally, there would be millions of parents, siblings and other supporting family members who would be financially better off, able to pay down debt more quickly and save for their own retirements.

Minister Flaherty recognizes all of this, I presume, since he committed to increase funding for “skills training and career experiences” aimed at getting the disabled off various social services payrolls which, by the way, allows them to live in splendid poverty.

The problem is Mr. Flaherty is going down the wrong road to reach this admirable goal. Here’s why.

My daughter Quinn recently graduated from a two-year program at the esteemed George Brown College culinary school. She has a previous diploma from the prestigious Rochester Institute of Technology in Laboratory Sciences. Her references and marks are very good, she has work experience in the field and her passion for the kitchen is boundless, though it sometimes drives her mother crazy.

Comfortable in the hearing world, Quinn also has a brown belt in karate, a love of vegetable gardening, rides horses well and has become an avid culinary blogger. All of this while battling the disadvantage of talking with her hands in a very verbal world.

But job? Not so much.

Quinn was looking for an entry level chef position, yet interview after interview she was told that she “lacked experience” or “wasn’t what we are looking for.”

I know many young job seekers who aren’t disabled hear the same thing in these times of high youth unemployment. But in the case of my daughter this is employer code for: “I don’t understand how to handle or don’t want to be bothered with someone who has a disability.”

I know this for a fact because I’ve run employment interference for my daughter since she got her first job at the age of 12, walking ponies at parties. I have spent more than a decade begging that she be given a chance.

Fears and attitudes haven’t changed much since that first job. It is particularly sad in an industry that prides itself on supporting community causes with festivals, taste events and charitable dinners. I know chefs dedicated to improving the health of our children, healing the environment and battling the loss of farmland. But a disability in my kitchen, I don’t think so.

Just imagine, for a moment, how tightly the windows are shuttered against the disabled in other, less empathetic industries.

Mr. Flaherty’s skills training will help, but according to Statistics Canada’s 2011 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, more of the disabled already have a trade certificate than the nondisabled population (11 per cent vs. 9 per cent .) As well, 17 per cent of adults with disabilities have a college certificate — exactly the same as the general population. Yet only 41 per cent of the disabled are employed versus 76 per cent of other Canadians.

Instead, what we need is a massive attitude change among employers towards the disabled.

Halton Region, home to the largest deaf population per capita in Canada, is a prime example of my point. Seven years ago my daughter didn’t get an interview for a summer camp job she was eminently qualified to do. Quinn protested. In a meeting with Milton officials, no one could point to a single deaf or hard of hearing person employed full or part-time then or in anyone’s memory. Yet the provincial deaf school had been located there for almost 50 years.

So, Minister Flaherty, when you have a moment could we have another brief, parent-to-parent chat? I’m certain I could help you reach your goal of putting the disabled to work far more quickly.

http://www.moneyville.ca/article/1183044--griffiths-finance-minister-jim-flaherty-could-i-have-a-word?bn=1

May 16 2012 10:38 am
The Coalition for Persons with Disabilities and the Palisoc-Wilton family would like to invite you to their 1st Annual Golf Tournament fundraiser.
 
The tournament will be held on Thursday June 21st at 9 am at Mayfield Golf Club. The $100 fee gets you a green fee, cart, bbq lunch and a chance to win lots of great prizes and raise money for an amazing family in our community.
 
They are raising funds for the Palisoc-Wilton family and in particular William Palisoc-Wilton who had to fight very hard to stay with his loving parents Maricyl and Charlie over the past couple of weeks. For anyone who needs a little “pick me up”  I encourage you to watch this CBC clip which highlights the hard work. toronto-cerebral-palsy.html
 
There are opportunities to support this event by sponsoring a hole, so if there are any businesses that would be interested please contact: Ryan Machete at Tel: 905 502 0565 ext 222
e-mail: ryan.machete@disabilityaccess.org
 
SEE FLYER BELOW
Flyer
May 16 2012 10:21 am
The Coalition for Persons with Disabilities and the Palisoc-Wilton family would like to invite you to their 1st Annual Golf Tournament fundraiser.
 
The tournament will be held on Thursday June 21st at 9 am at Mayfield Golf Club. The $100 fee gets you a green fee, cart, bbq lunch and a chance to win lots of great prizes and raise money for an amazing family in our community.
 
They are raising funds for the Palisoc-Wilton family and in particular William Palisoc-Wilton who had to fight very hard to stay with his loving parents Maricyl and Charlie over the past couple of weeks. For anyone who needs a little “pick me up”  I encourage you to watch this CBC clip which highlights the hard work. toronto-cerebral-palsy.html
 
There are opportunities to support this event by sponsoring a hole, so if there are any businesses that would be interested please contact: Ryan Machete at Tel: 905 502 0565 ext 222
e-mail: ryan.machete@disabilityaccess.org
 
SEE FLYER BELOW 
 
 
Breakthrough technology
April 19 2012 9:35 am

New technology offers breakthrough in cerebral palsy treatment

 

TORONTO – American scientists say a new nanotechnology-based technique that can target hard-to-reach parts of the brain could be used to treat cerebral palsy.

The treatment helped rabbits born with the condition regain mobility, marking a breakthrough in cerebral palsy research and providing patients with a hope that treatment may be available after birth.

Researchers at John Hopkins University Medicine say tree-like molecules called dendrimers can make their way past barriers in the brain and carry drugs to areas affected by cerebral palsy.

Baby rabbits treated with the dendrimers had increased motor function within five days after being treated at birth, according to lead researcher, Dr. Sujatha Kannan.

Rabbits’ brains develop before birth and after birth, like humans, which is why the animal was used in the study. Most animals are born with motor abilities nearly fully-formed.

Cerebral palsy weakens muscle movements and posture due to damage in the developing brain, either in the womb or during the first few months of a baby’s life. It’s an umbrella term – doctors diagnose the condition to a wide variety of nervous system disorders.

CP affects between one in 500 and one in 1,000 newborns, though some infants aren’t as affected as others.

The brain tries to respond to injury by activating cells called microglia and astrocytes, but these cells can “overreact” leading to inflammation, the researchers say.

While current anti-inflammatory drugs can’t successfully make their way to affected areas in the brain, Kannan’s team suggests that the dendrimers hit target areas and force inflamed cells to “eat up their own poison.”

“(Dendrimers) can go into these cells and deliver the poison that shuts these cells down. When you do that you can have a dramatically positive motor function in animals that suffer from cerebral palsy,” Kannan told Global National’s Jennifer Tryon.

“Shutting down ongoing inflammation can have a dramatically positive consequence to CP.”

The rabbits that were treated with dendrimers could take steps, hops, walk around and their hind limbs weren’t stiff compared to their counterparts that didn’t receive treatment.

The researchers’ next steps include studying if these positive results recorded in the baby rabbits can be sustained into adulthood.

They conceded that there’s a “big difference” between trials in animals and humans, so there will be more work ahead.

“But we think this holds a pretty big promise. Especially in cerebral palsy,” Kannan said.


http://www.globalnews.ca/cerebral+palsy+treatment/6442623587/story.html

 
Ontario Budget 2012
March 26 2012 12:24 pm

TORONTO - Ontario's cash-strapped Liberals are freezing welfare and delaying planned increases to the Ontario Child Benefit in Tuesday's budget to help slay a $16-billion deficit.

Social assistance, which includes Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program, will be frozen for a year, Premier Dalton McGuinty announced Sunday.

The child benefit was supposed to rise from the current $1,100 a year per child to $1,310 a year in July 2013. Instead, it will be increased more gradually — "in a more affordable way" — to $1,210 in 2013 and $1,310 in 2014, McGuinty said.

The one-year delay will save about $90 million next year, according to the government.

"Others would make different choices," McGuinty said, noting that the previous Progressive Conservative government cut welfare by 22 per cent.

"We are not prepared to balance this budget on the backs of families who may find themselves in difficult circumstances for the time being, or on the backs of our children."

But that's exactly what the minority Liberals are doing, both opposition parties said.

The New Democrats, who oppose the measures, wouldn't say whether it's a dealbreaker for them. NDP support for the budget is crucial for the minority Liberals to avoid an election, as the Progressive Conservatives have already signalled that they'll oppose the budget.

"We're going to have to really look at everything that this government is proposing and making that decision as a caucus," said New Democrat Michael Mantha.

"Basically, we want to see life being a little bit more affordable for everyday families, and this is going to make it that much harder for them to meet those bills at the end of the month."

McGuinty said he hopes the NDP will still support the budget, which will contain other measures that the third party will be able to support.

"This has been my toughest budget by far, because it confronts a deficit which we must necessarily eliminate over time for all the right reasons," he said.

If McGuinty isn't going to follow through with economist Don Drummond's advice to freeze the child benefit, he needs to put something else on the chopping block, which he hasn't done, said Tory finance critic Peter Shurman.

"If he's serious about actually wanting to attack the deficit, stop the drip, drip, drip, drip," Shurman said. "Stop sitting on the backs of people who are the least capable of defending themselves and man up."

On Friday, the Liberals announced plans to wind down the Ontario Northland Transportation Commission — a move that could affect hundreds of workers in the north — and sell eight government buildings to free up more cash.

They also shut down slot machines at racetracks in Fort Erie, Sarnia and Windsor, throwing 560 people out of work.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/03/25/ontario-budget-welfare-freeze_n_1378369.html

ARCH written ARCH\'s Submission to the Social Assi
March 23 2012 12:21 pm

ARCH comments on Discussion Paper 2: Approaches for Reform released by the Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario. The Commission has a significant mandate to make recommendations to the government to reform social assistance in Ontario. The Commissioners state that it is clear to them that they need to transform the social assistance system significantly.  The Commission must now submit recommendations and an action plan for reforming Ontario's social assistance system to the Ontario government by June 30, 2012. It is very important that the Commissioners hear from people with disabilities from the perspective of their lived experience.   ARCH gratefully acknowledges the meaningful input provided to us by our clients with disabilities and our community partners to inform our submissions. Read ARCH’s submissions here. 

http://www.archdisabilitylaw.ca/?q=archs-submission-social-assistance-review-commission

Dine & Discuss - Meeting New People
January 17 2012 11:56 am

The Anne Johnston Health Station Presents:

SexAbility - 'Dine & Discuss'

January Topic: Meeting New People

Learn tips on how to start conversations and offer some suggestions of where to meet new people. It can be fun!!

Come and kick back for a great conversation and a casual meal. You are welcome to bring a friend

Where: The Anne Johnston Health Station - 2398 Yonge St.

Cost: FREE!

Attendant Services Provided

Registration: Lynda - 416-486-8666 x248, lyndar@ajhs.ca

* SexAbility, a program of The Anne Johnston Health Station, provides sexual health information to youth and young adults with mobility disabilities through peer-to-peer education, workshops, social events, and resources*

January 17 2012 11:37 am

Women with Disabilities Action Awareness Group presents:

Movie Munchie Nights 2012

Opportunties for women to interact within a supportive Independent Livnig Environment. Films may contain material of a sensitive and controversial nature.

Location: The Anne Johnston Health Station, 2398 Yonge St., Toronto

For more information: Call Lucy - 416-486-8666 x226

For dates please visit the Planning Program Calendar on the OFCP website.

(Please click on the box with an arrow on the right corner of the screen to indicate which month you are interested in viewing.)

Nutrition and Healthy Living Workshop - CILT
January 17 2012 11:33 am

The Centre for Independent Living in Toornto (CILT) presents....

Nutrition and Healthy Living Workshop for People with Disabilities

Date: Thursday January 19, 2012

Time: 1:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Location: CILT Board Room, Suite 902. 365 Bloor St. East (and Sherbourne St.)

Cost: FREE!

Light Refreshments will be provided. Wheelchair accessible and scent-free event.

Attendant Services Provided. Please make other accessibility accomodations and/or dietary needs requests in advance.

RSVP: Melanie Moore - 416-599-2458 x228 or info@cilt.ca